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Sixty-six cents was all it took to purchase about one acre of land upon which the first significant building in the Hurlock area was built. The Washington Chapel was constructed in a grove of trees adjacent to the current town limits.

 

Hurlock was incorporated in 1892 and is the second largest municipality in Dorchester County. Because of its excellent rail transportation network that carried both passengers and products to major destinations, Hurlock became the industrial and commercial hub in the northern part of Dorchester County. It still holds this position, as is reflected in its motto “On track…since 1892.” Hurlock has numerous smaller businesses related to food and poultry products, trucking and other manufacturing.

 

The fully-serviced Hurlock Industrial Park was established on a 97 acre tract of land purchased by the Town Council in 1987. The entire Industrial Park was designated as a State Enterprise Zone in 1989, and re-designated in 1999. In 2001 the Enterprise Zone was expanded with an additional 146 acres. Hurlock has both “light” and “heavy” industrial land in its Enterprise Zone.

 

Hurlock has maintained not only the industrial and commercial significance bestowed by its railroad presence but also the community spirit first exhibited with the construction of the Washington Chapel. The Hurlock Free Library, which is the oldest library on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and the second oldest in the state, originated in the Hurlock home of Henry Walworth in 1900 and later moved to a larger facility. The Town acquired and refurbished the prior Library building for use as a community center.

 

The Town also purchased, relocated and refurbished a train station that is similar to the design of the first station built in Hurlock in 1867.  The building is used for special community activities and meetings. Hurlock community spirit is best reflected at the Hurlock Fall Festival, held on the first Saturday in October.


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